Diverse and Inclusive Advertising in the Wake of Blackface

One could be forgiven, or at least, definitely understood, if they awoke in recent weeks from a 100 year coma and thought not a lot had changed.

It’s appalling that in 2019, especially February, which is the month we celebrate and honor black Americans for their culture, contributions, and creative endeavors, that the news has been smattered with story after story about blackface. From elected politicians to high-fashion sweaters, it seems as though we can’t flip on a news station or scroll through a news site without seeing a case of blackface.

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Content Delivery in 2020 Politics: Live, Live, Live!

Make no mistake: The 2020 presidential campaign, already kicking into gear, will take place in an unprecedented media and engagement marketing environment of in-your-face, unfiltered (and often cringe-worthy) immediacy. Political live-streaming as a communication tool could not only bestow authenticity to an otherwise stale and scripted primary process, but it may also result in digital-savvy candidates vaulting over everyone else.

Think Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, only with people who want to be the Leader of the Free World, poor lighting, and fewer laughs.

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From Ice Cream to E-Juice, Cage-Free Critters and Sustainable Soup: The Future of Product Packaging for Kids

One Mad Hit Juice Box.  V’Nilla Cookies & Milk. Whip’d Strawberry.  Carnival Crunch. Twirly Pop. Could these be new ice cream flavors from Ben & Jerry’s?  Or Kellogg cereals? Nope. They are flavors of E-Juice, also known as smoke juice or E-liquid, a nicotine-based liquid used in electronic cigarettes and personal vaporizers.

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The Economic Costs of #MeToo: Quantifying a Movement

Les Moonves, the longtime CBS chairman and CEO, is out as the latest #MeToo casualty in the wake of sexual assault and abuse allegations detailed by The New Yorker’s Ronan Farrow.  Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose, Roger Ailes, Bill O’Reilly, Louis C.K., and Kevin Spacey - also gone, but not forgotten.  As the list continues to grow, so does the outrage and price of keeping a sexual abuser on the payroll.  Just consider the astoundingly low opening receipts of Spacey’s latest film release, Billionaire Boys Club:  $126.00.  Not $126 million, or thousand, but just 126 dollars.  Less than the cost of a new pair of designer jeans. If you wondered how much Spacey (who denies the allegations) would suffer, you can now do the math.

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